09 632 1138 info@iwh.co.nz
Planning your OE?  Welcome to International Working Holidays
 
 
 

A Fitting Future | Namibia Wildlife Conservation

A Fitting Future | Namibia Wildlife Conservation

Author -  Pops

Human-carnivore conflict is an inevitable occurrence in a country where man and wild strive to maintain a peaceful coexistence. One of the projects we work with in Namibia works on avid research producing the evidence required to facilitate amicable cohabitation. 2016 saw the arrival of a feline leopard Inara. Orphaned, weak and barely clinging to life, Inara was found trapped in a cage in eastern Namibia. She was just 2 months old at the time.

 

cheetah conservation namibia.jpg

 

Amadeus shared a similar traumatic start to life and was found wandering alone on a farm situated in the central northern part of Namibia. This resilient champ, whose mother was killed as a result of human-wildlife conflict, miraculously survived on his own for two weeks.

 

The two became neighbours and instantly took a strong liking to one another, this being made clearly evident when Amadeus dextrously dug his way into Inara’s enclosure.

 

The project tirelessly sourced funds to construct a larger enclosure for the seemingly love-smitten leopards. Stitching SPOTS leaped to the leopards’ aid and ensured the build of a bigger camp was made possible. The pair are regularly spotted on camera traps, their health and well-being continually monitored.


cheetah stealth camera conservation.png


Two years in captivity, the time frame required to allow big cats to reach the adequate size for a successful release, is imminently approaching. The team’s tenacity in ensuring the twosome have remained unhabituated, has been crucial to their future of freedom. A stringent regime sees the predator pair having no human contact, the daily feeding ritual furthermore performed in a manner that does not allow vehicles to be associated with food. Their inherently wild natures have remained wholly intact – imperative in elevating the survival chances of predators provided with a second chance and released back into the wild where they belong.

 

The project will do its utmost to find suitable release sites, returning the wild to the wild and letting two leopards reclaim the lives they rightly deserve.

 

Fill out my online form.

A Fitting Future | Namibia Wildlife Conservation

Human-carnivore conflict is an inevitable occurrence in a country where man and wild strive to maintain a peaceful coexistence. One of the projects we work with in Namibia works on avid research producing the evidence required to facilitate amicable cohabitation.

Human-carnivore conflict is an inevitable occurrence in a country where man and wild strive to maintain a peaceful coexistence. One of the projects we work with in Namibia works on avid research producing the evidence required to facilitate amicable cohabitation. 2016 saw the arrival of a feline leopard Inara. Orphaned, weak and barely clinging to life, Inara was found trapped in a cage in eastern Namibia. She was just 2 months old at the time.

 

cheetah conservation namibia.jpg

 

Amadeus shared a similar traumatic start to life and was found wandering alone on a farm situated in the central northern part of Namibia. This resilient champ, whose mother was killed as a result of human-wildlife conflict, miraculously survived on his own for two weeks.

 

The two became neighbours and instantly took a strong liking to one another, this being made clearly evident when Amadeus dextrously dug his way into Inara’s enclosure.

 

The project tirelessly sourced funds to construct a larger enclosure for the seemingly love-smitten leopards. Stitching SPOTS leaped to the leopards’ aid and ensured the build of a bigger camp was made possible. The pair are regularly spotted on camera traps, their health and well-being continually monitored.


cheetah stealth camera conservation.png


Two years in captivity, the time frame required to allow big cats to reach the adequate size for a successful release, is imminently approaching. The team’s tenacity in ensuring the twosome have remained unhabituated, has been crucial to their future of freedom. A stringent regime sees the predator pair having no human contact, the daily feeding ritual furthermore performed in a manner that does not allow vehicles to be associated with food. Their inherently wild natures have remained wholly intact – imperative in elevating the survival chances of predators provided with a second chance and released back into the wild where they belong.

 

The project will do its utmost to find suitable release sites, returning the wild to the wild and letting two leopards reclaim the lives they rightly deserve.

 

Fill out my online form.
A Fitting Future | Namibia Wildlife Conservation

What do you think? Love to hear your comments!

Name *
Subscribe
Comment *

Related Articles

How to apply for a UK Visa

How to apply for a UK Visa

Date:Saturday, 16 February 2019

Trying to apply for a UK Visa can be a nightmare at the best of times. There's never anyone to answer your questions and you never actually know if you are doing it correctly or not. It's a bit like ...

How long does it take to get a NZ Police Check

How long does it take to get a NZ Police Check

Date:Friday, 15 February 2019

NZ Police Checks are provided by the Ministry of Justice and can take 4 weeks if you apply through the free route via MOJ. There are faster ways to get your NZ Police Check - which is essentially a ...

A life changing experience for me

A life changing experience for me

Date:Wednesday, 13 February 2019

I have always been drawn to all sorts of wildlife but the fact the the Save the Lions conservation centre research was mainly based on lions really interested me. It’s not often that you get the ...

 
 
 
We'll find you the perfect job overseas.
 
Copyright © 2001 - Nannies Abroad Limited trading as International Working Holidays. All rights reserved  |  Website Design by Labyrinth Solutions  |  Content Management by Contegro
International Working Holidays™, International Working Holidays Logo, Nannies Abroad™ and Nannies Abroad Logo are trade marks of Nannies Abroad Limited trading as International Working Holidays.